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  • user warning: Can't find record in 'cache_filter' query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<!--paging_filter--><p>\nA new study<sup><b>[1]</b></sup><i> </i>suggests that one of the best ways to combat the <a href=\"/node/6349\">chronic underreporting</a>\nof concussion by athletes may be to educate  coaches on ways to create an environment where athletes feel safe reporting concussion symptoms.  It adds to a\ngrowing body of evidence challenging the conventional wisdom that \ninadequate athlete concussion knowledge is the \nprincipal barrier to increased reporting, and that other ways need to be found to keep athletes safe, including enlisting coaches and parents in creating an environment in which concussion symptom reporting is encouraged.', created = 1566598700, expire = 1566685100, headers = '' WHERE cid = '3:91d29a49851e7c9b68b31abe09f2f065' in /home/momsteam/public_html/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 174.

Concussion Rate For Female Middle-School-Aged Soccer Players 4 Times Higher Than For High School Athletes

Female middle school soccer players sustained concussions at a rate higher than their high school and college counterparts, most continued to play despite experiencing symptoms, and less than half sought medical attention, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Heading in Soccer Doesn't Lead To Long-Term Cognitive Decline, Study Finds

Preliminary data from a study of retired professional English soccer players has found that, once their playing careers end, the chronic low-level head trauma they sustained from repetitive heading does not put them at greater risk of long-term cognitive decline than the general population.

Coaches Can Play Important Role in Encouraging Athletes To Report Concussion Symptoms, Studies Find

A growing number of studies challenge the conventional wisdom that inadequate athlete concussion knowledge is the principal barrier to increased concussion symptom reporting.  Because educating youth about the dangers of concussion is unlikely to improve concussion reporting, they say other ways need to be found to increase reporting, among them being to enlist coaches to help create an environment where athletes feel safe in reporting.

Middle School Headgear Mandate For Soccer, Lacrosse, and Field Hockey Came As Surprise

The recent move by the Princeton (NJ) school district to require headgear for all middle-school soccer, field hockey and lacrosse players has generated controversy. MomsTEAM's sports concussion neuropsychologists has concerns about the effectiveness of such headgear and says the focus needs to be on education, training, rules enforcement, and hiring more athletic trainers.

Underreporting of Concussion By High School Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education

As many as four out of ten of possible concussions sustained by high school athletes are never reported to a coach or medical professional, with less than one in seven  'bell-ringers' being reported, finds an important new study.

Sports-Related Facial Fractures: Relatively Common But Preventable

Nearly half of sports-related facial fractures among children occur in baseball and softball, says a new study in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, many of which could be prevented if players wore face shields while fielding.

Stronger Necks May Reduce Brain Trauma From Soccer Heading, Study Says

Balanced neck strength may reduce the acceleration of the head during the act of heading a soccer ball, thus reducing the risk of brain injury from such low grade hits, says a 2013 study. The study adds to a growing body of evidence that strengthening neck muscles may be a way to reduce head injury risk from concussion and repetitive sub-concussive trauma.

Double Digit Decline In Youth Sports Injuries Over Last Decade, New Study Finds

There is good news and bad news on the youth sports injury front. The good news is that sports and recreation musculoskeletal injuries declined 12.4 percent in the U.S. over the past 10 years for children ages 5 to 14 years. The bad news: injuries in football and soccer went up, says a new study.

Concussion Education For High School Soccer Players Lacking, Survey Finds

A survey of high school athletic directors, coaches, and certified athletic trainers in Michigan finds that, while concussion education is very common in football, less than half of girls' soccer players received such education.

Girls May Be No Worse Off After Sports Concussions Than Boys, Study Finds

Girls don't appear to be worse off after sports-related concussion than boys, either in terms of concussion symptoms or on neurocognitive tests measuring reaction time and visual memory, a new study finds.
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