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Role Modeling: Kids Whose Parents Wear Helmets Skiing and Snowboarding Will Do The Same

Despite increased helmet use, the number of snow-sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) keeps rising, prompting calls by experts to implement a variety of targeted prevention strategies, with a special focus on educating parents about the protective value of helmets and the role modeling effect the parent's use has on their child's decision to wear a helmet.

More Children Visiting Emergency Room With Sports-Related Head Injuries, But Admissions Remain Steady, Study Says

The number of emergency department (ED) visits for sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) has risen over the past ten years, but the percentage of admissions has remained unchanged at about 10%, reports a new study. The study also reported a welcome trend towards admitting children with less severe TBI, which experts say may reflect a more cautious approach to management of brain injuries involving greater emphasis on in-patient observation to watch for signs of a serious brain injury, less routine use of CT and MRI scans, and less reliance on parents to observe their children for such signs at home in borderline cases.  

Youth Sports Safety: By The Numbers

A helpful compilation of statistics on concussions, exercise-induced asthma, exertional heat illness, sudden cardiac arrest, exertional sickling, use of steroids and dietary supplements, and cervical spine injury collected by the National Athletic Trainers' Association.

Traumatic Brain Injury in Kids and Teens Can Impact School Performance

Kids and teens suffering from traumatic brain injury, such as concussion, may struggle with speech, language, and thinking, which can lead to problems reading or memorizing. A school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) can help a concussed student and his or her family and teachers to create a treatment plan.

Seven Ways To Reduce Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury In Sports

Brain trauma to youth and high school players in contact and collision sports can occur not just from violent helmet-on-helmet collisions but from repetitive sub-concussive blows.  There are five major ways to reduce exposure to such hits, experts say.

William P. Meehan, III, M.D. (Sports Concussion Doctor): I Owe My Career Choice To A Single Patient

Two years ago, in recognition of April as Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we reprise the blog submitted by William P. Meehan, III, M.D., Director of the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Sports Concussion Clinic, and Research for the Brain Injury Center at Boston Children's Hospital.

By William P. Meehan, III, M.D.

Why did I get into my field?

I owe my career choice to a single patient.

Sports concussion doctor William P. Meehan, III, M.D. talks about how he owes his career choice to a single patient he treated in the emergency room.

Repetitive Head Impacts: A Growing Concern in Youth Sports

Brain trauma among football players may be less the result of violent helmet-on-helmet collisions that cause concussions as the accumulation of sub-concussive blows.  The long-term effects of such repetitive brain trauma are still unknown.

Helmets Significantly Reduce Head Injuries Among Skiers and Snowboarders

Ever wonder if media exposure can have a positive effect on sports safety? One has to look no further than to what happened after the deaths of two celebrities in skiing accidents in Europe and North America during the winter of 2008-9, the first, a German politician, wearing a ski helmet, who suffered a traumatic brain injury but survived a collision with a helmet-less mother of four on a ski slope in Austria on New Year's Day 2009 in which the woman died; the second, involving actress Natasha Richardson, who died after a traumatic head injury while skiing without a helmet on a beginner's slope in Quebec in March 2009.

Head Injuries: When Is Immediate Hospitalization Required?

Deteriorating mental status after head trauma may indicate a more serious, potentially life-threatening brain injury requiring immediate hospitalization.

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