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Team Culture Is Reflected In Its Attention To Detail


Top teams have a strong culture which is nurtured by coaches and team officials.

It could be described as a "How we do business, here" attitude, one deeply rooted in the leaders' values and beliefs about what is important to run a successful youth sports program.

A program's values and beliefs are on display every day in the form of team communications, attention to detail, group dynamics, and the decisions that the coaches make.  

Top teams have a strong culture which is nurtured by coaches and team officials. A longtime hockey coach explains how a team's culture and values is often reflected in its attention to the smallest detail.

Private and Public School Sports: Same Problems With Coaches, But Handled Differently

The subject of which has better coaches: private or public school always seems to spark some petty good debate but my experience and insight into the differences between private and public school sports is a subject that I have spent some time studying for the last year, and I have made some really profound discoveries.

The most revealing discovery was the dynamics of the high school teams that I researched from both private and public schools all had one very common thread. They all have the same coaching issues, the same drama, the same politics, the same favoritism, the same  nepotism, and most critically, the same breakdown in coach/player relationships and lack of understanding. But they are all  dealt with in a very different way.

Public and private schools have the same coaching issues, the same drama, the same politics, the same
favoritism, the same  nepotism, and most critically, and the same breakdown
in coach/player relationships and lack of understanding, but tend to deal with these issues in a very different way.

Why Loyalty Is Bad For Youth Sports And Society

Everybody uses the word loyalty and some seem to embrace the phrase as if it had some parallel to ethics and I believe the word should be given some reconsideration by all. After being involved with many different youth athletic programs for the past several years, I have had the opportunity to observe youth leagues that are on opposite poles of the economic and social spectrum. I have coached in the wealthiest of suburban youth leagues and I've coached in inner city leagues that were in the most plighted areas where driving to and from practices made me very nervous.

Fresh Ideas For Growing a Youth Sports Program

Looking for ways to grow your local youth sports program? MomsTeam founder and publisher Brooke de Lench has some suggestions on registration, advertising, cross-promotion, and making sports programs more family-friendly, especially in these tough economic times when the cost of sports may be impeding full participation.

Coaches Curing Kids Cancer: A Sports Mom Raises Money In Son's Memory

Instead of buying your child's coach an end-of-season gift, donate the money to Coaches Curing Kids' Cancer.  The coach will get a t-shirt, baseball cap or whistle along with a personalized certificate and you be joining in the fight to find a cure for pediatric cancer.

What Does a Team Mom Do?

From handing out schedules, setting up the snack and drink schedule, and sending out e-mails, to keeping player rosters and statistics, and organizing team parties and buying end-of-season gifts for the coaches, team moms are critical to a successful youth sports season.

Advice for Sports Moms from a Sports Mom

Women, particularly the mothers who volunteer, are often the backbone of what makes a youth sports team work smoothly.
Unfortunately, as with dads, when it comes to their own child's sports team, a mom's greatest strengths can become weaknesses that can cause problems for her child and his/her coach. 

Equal Playing Time: Should It Be the Rule, Not the Exception?

Giving the "best" players more playing time than the so-called "weaker" players may help a team win more games, but at what cost? Some boys never miss practice, yet only played the minimum. Others hardly ever, or never, come to practice, yet are "rewarded" for their lack of commitment with extra playing time because the coach wants to win. I believe that an equal playing or significant playing time should be the rule rather than the exception, at least up until high school varsity or until players are playing at the highest levels of their sport.

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