Parent's Role

Number One Ingredient For Athletic Success Is Passion, Says Mike Boyle

The number one ingredient for athletic success, says top strength and conditioning coach Mike Boyle, is passion. "Find something your kid loves," he tells 4-time Olympic medalist Angela Ruggiero. "You can't want it for them."

Misplaced Priorities: Parents Should Spend More Time Helping Kids Prepare For Life, Less Time Preparing For Next Game

 

American athletics has become so all consuming that many parents have lost sight of the reality of youth sports. What started a hundred years ago in the New York public school system has now morphed into big business, which is feeding unrealistic expectations for parents and kids alike.

Here are a couple of examples, just from today: 

American athletics has become so all consuming that many parents have lost sight of the reality of youth sports. What started a hundred years ago in the New York public school system has now morphed into big business and unrealistic expectations for parents and kids alike.

Self-Awareness Is Critical To Successful Sports Parenting, Says Author of New Book

Do you possess sports parenting self-awareness?Have you considered how you appear to your child if you look upset, disappointed, or angry at their games? If not, it's time you do. Being mindful of your own behavior and moods are critically important for every mom, dad, grandparent, or anyone else involved in youth sports, says the co-author of the new book,  "Raising Your Game - Over 100 Accomplished Athletes Help You Guide Your Girls and Boys Through Sports."

Moms Can Help Keep Young Athletes Hydrated and Performing At Their Best

Today's sports moms do much more than juggle schedules and drive athletes to and from games. Many also serve as coaches, assistant coaches, and team moms, or volunteer to bring snacks and drinks. Regardless of her role, one of the most important things a mom can do to help every athlete on the team perform at their best is to ensure that they are well-hydrated, before, during and after practices and games.

"Winning Takes Care of Everything" and Other Sporting Myths

Nike's latest edgy ad in which Tiger Woods claims that, "Winning takes care of everything," has evoked a wide range of responses in the media, and, one might hope, around the family dinner table. After all, why miss a teachable moment when you're a parent of a young athlete? But what exactly is Nike's message, wonders one commentator on sports and society.

Do's And Don'ts For Sports Parents

Parents of children playing sports, especially moms, play many important roles, many of which probably go unnoticed by your child, from arranging carpools to games to preparing halftime snacks for the team. But what about your involvement in the actual sports side of things? How can you help your child become better at the sport they play? Here is a list of do's and don'ts.

London Olympics: Celebrating Athletes And Their Moms

Watching 12 hours of Olympic coverage every day gives one Texas sports mom a chance to learn from lots of dedicated sports moms, and grandmums, including Queen Elizabeth II.

Watching The Olympics: Making It Fun and Educational For Kids

A two-time Olympic track cyclist and mom of two young children talks about how parents can make watching the London Olympics with their kids a fun and educational experience.

The Summer of Play: Eight Ways to Let Your Kid Be a Kid This Summer

A best-selling parenting author argues that the lack of unstructured play  is exacting a heavy price on our kids, but says that if you're ready to change your high-pressure, overscheduling ways, summer is the perfect time to get started.

David Kittner (a/k/a Youth Fitness Guy): Adults in Youth Sports Need To Always Remember It's For The Kids

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. We decided at MomsTEAM to designate June as National Sports Dads Month and all month long have been hearing from a fascinating range of men about what they have learned as sports dads, what their kids have learned, and, if they could change anything about today's youth sports, what it would be.

Today, we hear from longtime youth sports fitness expert and instructor, David Kittner:

MomsTEAM: Were you an athlete and what sports did you play as a youth (under 19)?Kittner family tree

A sports dad, coach, and longtime youth fitness instructor thinks the adults involved in youth sports, including league administrators, coaches and parents, need an attitude adjustment: to remember, first and foremost, that the game is for the kids.
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