Basics

Paul Bearmon (Internal Medicine): Fighting For Balance and Fairness in Youth Sports

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from Paul Bearmon, a physician in Minnesota and founder of KEAP (Keep 'Em All Playing).

Paul H. Bearmon, MD

A physician tells of how he counsels parents of youth athletes to keep sports in perspective and fights to make youth sports that serves the interests of all children, not just the select few.

Social Media: What A Student-Athlete Posts Online Matters, More Than You May Think

Social media is woven into the fabric and culture of American life, but one ill-advised "Tweet" or Facebook status update could result in a student-athlete's suspension from school or team or even the loss of a college athletic scholarship.  Here's what parents can do to help their child protect their online reputation.

Controlling Your Inner Coach

So now that baseball is in "full swing" I have mixed emotions as a parent.  My younger two sons decided after a family meeting not to play as we agreed that football and basketball were enough for the year.  We would do some one-on-one instruction to help the 11-year- old pitch better, and for my 8-year-old, just playing catch in the backyard would have to do. 

A single mom realizes the need to control her inner coach when she finds herself caught in the age-old battle of the sexes with her son's baseball coach, feeling a need to compete with the coaches for no other reason than they are men and because she had a hard time resisting the thought that, in the back of their minds, they think she is clueless about how to teach her boys how to do the hard stuff like pitching and quarterbacking,

Parenting for the Game of Life

March is a busy time of year as winter sports wind down and spring/summer sports wind up. This is a time of year where the demands on parents to get kids to their in-season activities and the early sessions of the next season is daunting. Being a parent is hard with all of the pressures that your kids place on you and the pressure to participate non-stop all year-round in almost every sport. 

A longtime youth hockey coach advises sports parents to just say no, to place limits on excessive sports, and have their kids spend more time on things that matter more in life in the long run.

Saying Goodbye To Baseball

Her son's decision to retire from baseball at the ripe old age of eleven to focus on football was tough to take, says one mom, but eventually shock and denial gave way to acceptance.

Sports Are Great For Kids, But Too Much Comes With Risks

The benefits of sports participation are numerous, says Lyle Micheli, M.D., Director, Division of Sports Medicine at Children's Hospital Boston, including improved physical fitness and opportunities for socialization.  Parents should help their child find a sport they enjoy, but too much sports can result in psychological burnout, physical injuries, and turn the child off to physical exercise.

Youth Sports Is About Far More than Wins and Losses

I recently received an e-mail from a hockey parent in Vermont that was so powerful, I wanted to share it:  

Hi Hal

An email from a hockey parent and coach puts winning versus having fun in its proper perspective.

The Best Thing Tom Brady, Sr. May Have Done For His Son: Nothing

Yesterday, I had a chance to talk with Tom Brady, Sr. in his Boston office. Yes, that  Tom Brady. Father of  New England Patriot quarterback Tom Brady.

It was actually the second time I had had a chance to talk with Tom.  The first time was at a seminar in Harvard Square a year or two back in which he was on the panel. This time we had a chance to talk at length.  I came away with a much better understanding of the "recipe" he used in raising a super hero: not only an elite athlete, but a wonderful person, too.Tom Brady and Tom Brady, Sr. embracing

The best thing Tom Brady's father may have done for him was not talking to his college football coach at the University of Michigan about his son's lack of playing time.

Kids Who Delay Sports Specialization More Coordinated and Physically Fit, Study Finds

Boys participating in more than one sport before age 12 are more physically fit and have better gross motor coordination than those who specialize in a single sport early, says a new study.  Whether the reason is because they play multiple sports or because the best athletes choose not to specialize early is unclear.

Peak Performance In Classroom And Sports: Ways Parents Can Help

There are several ways parents can help kids achieve peak performance in the classroom and in sports.
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