Basics

Three Stages of Athletic Development: Sampling, Specializing, Investment

There are three main phases of development for the youth athlete: Phase One (Exploration), Phase Two (Commitment) and Phase Three (Proficiency). While the developmental stages are issues for the entire family, some fundamental principles apply, regardless of phase.

Winning and Losing in Sports: Ten Tips for Parents

No matter how talented your child may be, there are going to days when he doesn't play his best, or when, despite his best effort, his team loses. How you manage both the ups, and the inevitable downs, will play a large role in whether your child has a successful youth sports experience.

Should I Let My Daughter Play On the Boys' Team?

By Doreen Greenberg, Ph. D.

There are many factors for a parent and an aspiring young female athlete to consider when deciding whether she should play on an all-boys' team.  Is she pretty adept at the fundamentals of the sport? Are her skills on an equal footing with the boys?  Does she thrive on the competition?  Is the coach gender-blind - giving equal opportunities to everyone?  Does he foster an environment where masculinity and feminity are not questioned?  If you can answer yes - then let her play!

Don't Criticize Your Child's Athletic Performance

The last thing a child needs to hear is a parent criticizing their performance or giving coaching pointers. What they want most is unconditional support and encouragement, not criticism.

Over-Involved Youth Sports Parent: Are You One?

Children and teens are uncomfortable if parents listen to their music, wear their style of clothes, or use their slang or become over-involved with their school, friends or sports.  Here are some warning signs.

Attending Your Child's Practice Can Be Rewarding

There are a number of reasons you might consider attending some of your child's practices in addition to his games. Watching your child practices gives you a chance to see how he is developing as a player and is an excellent way to let your child know that you care about his participation in sports and that every aspect is important, not just the games, not just whether his team wins or loses, or how he performs.

Five Ways To Model Good Sportsmanship For Your Child

There are five things you can do as a parent to show your children (and other parents) what being "a good sport" is really all about, says sports psychologist, Shane Murphy.

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