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The Plank And The World Cup: Recovering from A Sports-Related Back Injury (Part III)

The end of June and first part of July became an exceptionally busy time at our house, juggling the final stretch of Physical Therapy for our son while trying to watch every second of the soccer World Cup coverage! Lucky for us, the Physical Therapy gym is well equipped with TV monitors, all tuned in to sports! Physical therapy

A Texas football mom and her son juggle his final stretch of physical therapy after a stress fracture of his back with watching the Team USA in the FIFA World Cup.

If Your Teen Has Back Pain That Won't Go Away, See A Doctor!


As we head into the last month of the school year (at least for some of us), parents start asking each other, "Hey, what is your kid doing this summer? ("Translation for non-Texans: "What sports is your child playing this summer?")

As lots of sports parents know, summer does not always mean fun and hanging out by the swimming pool anymore. In this deeply sports-obsessed state, there is no off-season. Ever! Middle school football running back breaking tackle

When her 13-year-old son came home each day from track practice complaining of back pain, a Texas mom thought the pain wasn't anything to worry about. Turns out the pain was a red flag about a serious injury.

Foot and Ankle Injuries Common Among Athletes of All Ages, Experts Say

Foot and ankle injuries, such as plantar fasciitis, Lisfranc injuries, ankle sprains and stress fractures are common among athletes of all ages, from the youth to Olympic level, says the the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

Female Soccer Players At Risk for Stress Fractures, Long-Term Health Problems: Study

Elite female soccer players are at risk for menstrual irregularities and stress fractures from the combination of intense training and insufficient nutrition, says a new study.

Stress Fracture Risk Double for Girls in High-Impact Sports

Girls who play sports more than 8 hours per week are twice as likely as their less active peers to suffer a stress fracture, a new study finds. Most at risk were those engaged in three activities (running, basketball and cheerleading/gymnastics) which involve repeated jumping and landing which place particuarly high stress on bone, with the risk of injury increasing about 8 percent for each extra hour of activity over four per week.

Stress Fractures In High School Athletes: A Growing Problem

New research suggests that more intense training and inadequate diet are placing high school athletes at significant risk for developing stress fractures in the bones of the back, hip, leg and foot, with girls more likely to suffer such overuse injury and at an earlier age than boys.
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