Safety

Every Concussion Is Different, Says Dr. Robert Cantu

While concussions share certain characteristics, every concussion is unique to that particular individual, says Dr. Robert Cantu, and requires individualized management.

Grading Concussion Severity After Symptoms Clear Is Important

Dr. Robert Cantu says that while there is debate about the importance of grading concussions, he sees value, especially where an athlete has suffered multiple concussions and where the grading is done after the signs and symptoms have cleared.

Number, Intensity, and Degree of Concussion Symptoms Determine Severity, Says Dr. Robert Cantu

Duration, number and degree of post-concussion signs and symptoms determine concussion severity, says Dr. Robert Cantu.

Concussion Defined

A concussion Is defined as trauma (e.g. usually but not always a blow to the head, face or neck) which causes the brain  to collide with the skull. A "concussion" is derived from the Latin concutere, meaning to shake violently. It is also often referred to as an MTBI (mild traumatic brain injury).

No Return to Play If Still Have Concussion Symptoms

Sports concussion expert Dr. Cantu says that no athlete should be allowed to return to play sports after a concussion if still experiencing symptoms.

Recognizing Concussion Signs and Symptoms: Advice for Parents

Dr. Robert Cantu says it is extremely important that parents and athletes recognize the signs and symptoms of a concussion.  Not only do athletes need to self-report symptoms, says Dr. Cantu, but they should let the coaching and medical staff know if a teammate is experiencing symptoms.  It just might save his life.

Concussions: Monitor Child in First 24-48 Hours

Regular post-concussion monitoring is essential in the first 24 to 48 hours after injury to check for signs of deteriorating mental status that may indicate a more serious injury, says Dr. Robert Cantu.

Study Says Injury Rate for Girls Higher than Boys in High School Lacrosse

According to a 4-year study (2000- 2003) of injuries in lacrosse reported in the February 2007 issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine, high school girls experienced a significantly higher rate of HFE (head, face, and eye) injuries than boys, in part because of a lack of protective equipment. Hopefully, the injury rate for girls will drop now that protective eyewear for girls has become mandatory.

Protective Goggles Rule in Girls Lacrosse Supported By Study

The 2005 rule by US Lacrosse that female lacrosse players wear protective goggles came not a moment too soon. A study in the February 2007 issue of The American Journal Sports Medicine of injuries to high school and collegiate lacrosse players in the 4 year period (2000 to 2003) before the new equipment mandate went into effect discloses that high school girls and college women experienced a significantly higher rate of HFE (head, face, and eye) injuries than boys and college men.

Concussion Safety in Boys' Lacrosse

Neal Goldman, brand manager for men's lacrosse at Brine, discusses ways to reduce the risk of concussions in boys' lacrosse.

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