Safety

Atlanta Medical Group Proposes Sport-Specific Return-to-Play Guidelines

Four years after the American Academy of Pediatrics adopted the recommended return-to-play (RTP) guidelines proposed by the Third International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific guidelines for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk for concussion.

Sports-Related Facial Fractures: Relatively Common But Preventable

Nearly half of sports-related facial fractures among children occur in baseball and softball, says a new study in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, many of which could be prevented if players wore face shields while fielding.

Double Digit Decline In Youth Sports Injuries Over Last Decade, New Study Finds

There is good news and bad news on the youth sports injury front. The good news is that sports and recreation musculoskeletal injuries declined 12.4 percent in the U.S. over the past 10 years for children ages 5 to 14 years. The bad news: injuries in football and soccer went up, says a new study.

Buying Mouth Guards

There are three kinds of mouth guards, but, regardless of type, they help prevent injury to the mouth, teeth, lips, cheeks and tongue. But they are also breeding grounds for bacteria, so they should be sanitized daily.

Rules Dictate When an Injured Player Leaves the Court, but Common Sense Should Rule When a Player Returns- But Does It?

Player safety as it relates to  removal of a player upon sustaining a concussion is receiving much-needed attention by teams, as well as officials. Basketball rules, as set forth by the National Federation of State High School Associations  (NFHS), are clear: the official shall remove a player if he/she is displaying symptoms of a concussion, and the player can return to the game only if/when cleared by a medical professional.

When is it medically okay to return to the basketball court after injury, versus when does it truly makes sense to do so?  There's a big difference.

Youth Basketball Injuries: Basic First Aid For Minor Injuries

Most injuries in youth basketball are minor and can be treated with simple first-aid. Finger sprains are common, but ankle and knee injuries, especially in Grades 1 through 6, are not. Here's some basic first aid advice from a longtime coach.

Stress Fracture Risk Double for Girls in High-Impact Sports

Girls who play sports more than 8 hours per week are twice as likely as their less active peers to suffer a stress fracture, a new study finds. Most at risk were those engaged in three activities (running, basketball and cheerleading/gymnastics) which involve repeated jumping and landing which place particuarly high stress on bone, with the risk of injury increasing about 8 percent for each extra hour of activity over four per week.

Concussion Rates in High School Sports Vary By Sport and Gender

Concussion rates in thirteen high school sports from 1998 to 2008, as reported in three separate studies, vary widely by sport and, in some cases, by gender.

Skin Infections in Athletics: Preventing, Recognizing & Treating

Skin infections in athletes, including community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), are extremely common.  The nature of athletics, which expose the skin to a wide variety of stresses, trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents, all combine to continually attack the integrity of the skin and lead to considerable disruption to individual and team activities.  A new position statement by the National Athletic Trainers' Association, says that recognition of skin diseases is absolutely essential, particularly by certified athletic trainers, who "represent the first line of defense against spread of infections to other team members."

New Rules for High School Basketball Promoting Good Sportsmanship Approved for 2010-2011

Among the high school basketball rule changes recently approved for the 2010-11 season by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS)  are those promoting good sportsmanship.
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