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Safety-Pitchers

2014 Little League Pitch Count Limits and Mandatory Rest Rules

Revised pitch count limits, longer mandatory rest periods, and other rule changes implemented by Little League Baseball in 2010 to reduce shoulder and elbow overuse injuries to youth baseball pitchers remain in effect for 2014.

Little League Rules Protect Pitchers' Arms

In 2007, Little League Baseball dropped its decades-old pitching rules - which limited pitchers age 12 and under to six innings per week and six innings per game, with the number of innings increasing for older age groups in favor of rules based on pitch count, with the number of allowable pitches based on the pitcher's age and with specific rest periods between pitching appearances when a pitcher reaches higher thresholds of pitches delivered in a day.  Revised rules go into effect for the spring 2010 baseball season.

Preventing Pitching Injuries in Youth Baseball

Twelve ways to reduce the risk of baseball pitching injuries from overuse, poor pitching mechanics, and/or poor conditioning.

Reducing Weight of Baseball May Increase Risk Of Injury To Youth Baseball Pitchers

Using a lighter baseball would not significantly increase batted-ball impact injuries to position players in youth baseball, but would likely increase such injuries to pitchers, suggests a first-of-its-kind study.

Twelve Ways To Prevent Arm Injuries in Baseball

The latest expert advice on ways to minimize the risk that your young pitcher will suffer an injury to their elbow or shoulder.

Pitching Injury Statistics and Risk Factors

If your child is a pitcher, he/she has about a fifty-fifty chance of experiencing pain in his/her elbow or shoulder during his/her baseball career.

Preventing Pitching Injuries: Observe Pitch Count Limits and Rest Periods

One of the best ways to reduce the risk of overuse injuries for youth pitchers is to strictly observe per game,week, season, and yearly pitch limits.

Preventing Pitching Injuries: Take 3 to 4 Months Off Every Year From Pitching and Overhand Throwing Sports

To reduce the risk of injury, youth baseball pitchers need a period of "active rest" after the baseball season ends and before the next season begins during which they should stay physically active to maintain conditioning but refrain from overhand throwing of any kind

Pitching Injuries: Risk Factors

If your child is a pitcher, he/she has about a fifty-fifty chance of experiencing pain in his/her elbow or shoulder during his/her baseball career. Not surprisingly, baseball has been the most widely studied youth sport in the United States, so that the risk factors for overuse injuries are well-established.

Warm-Weather Baseball Pitchers At Greater Risk of Shoulder Injuries and Tommy John Surgery, Studies Find

The extra time high school pitchers living in warm-weather climates spend in baseball activities puts them at greater risk of injuries to their pitching shoulders than their cold-weather peers, finds a first-of-its-kind study published in the February 2011 edition of the American Journal of Sports Medicine
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