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Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.

 

Child-Specific Concussion Management Tools Needed, Study Says

Child-specific tools need to be developed and used for the diagnosis, recovery-assessment and management of their concussions, focusing less on return to play as the goal as return to learn, a new study recommends.

King-Devick Test: An Important Part of Sideline Concussion Screening Battery

A new study says that including the King-Devick test, a measure of fast eye movement, along with neurocognitive and balance testing as part of a battery of rapid concussion screening tools could improve assessment of athletes for suspected concussion on the sports sideline.

Maddocks Questions Test For Concussion On Sports Sideline

An important, and well-established, part of an assessment for concussion on the sports sideline under the most recent concussion guidelines is to test an athlete's orientation to time and place by asking the so-called "Maddocks questions."  Because they can be asked by anyone, they are valuable on sports sidelines where no health care professional trained in performing a full sideline screening for concussion is present.

Concussion Identification, Evaluation and Management: A Step-By-Step Process

Management of sport-related concussion involves a step-by-step process beginning before a sports season even starts, say the three newest concussion guidelines, and continuing through on-the-field evaluation, sideline assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and return to play.

Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3

The SCAT3 is a standardized method of evaluating injured athletes for concussion ages 13 years and older. Although designed for use by medical and health professionals, it includes advice for athletes and parents about signs to watch for in the first 24 to 48 hours after suspected concussion and a list of other important points, including the need for rest and avoiding strenuous activity, and not training or playing sport until medically cleared.

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