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Replace Electrolytes Lost During Sports

Sweating results in the loss of both electrolytes (particularly sodium) and water. Orange juice, moderate salting of food in the diet, and sports drinks help replace electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, and chloride lost during sports. 

Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps: Debunking Five Myths

We've all heard the myths about the cause, treatment, and prevention of muscle cramps that occur during or after exercise (termed exercise-associated muscle cramps or EAMC). We're told that to relieve EAMC you should eat bananas, mustard, or pickle juice, right? Is there any evidence for or against any of these so-called remedies? Actually, there is, says a leading expert

Valerie Berkowitz: Following Five Key Lifestyle Habits Key To Optimum Sports Performance

As Sports Nutrition Month at MomsTEAM rolls into its third week,  we hear from child nutrition expert, Valerie Berkowitz, Director of Nutrition Education at The Center for Balanced Health:

MomsTEAM: What do recommend sports-active kids eat for breakfast? 

Valerie Berkowitz and family

There is no magic bullet when it comes to giving your child the competitive edge, but following five key lifestyle habits will help make the difference.

Performance Nutrition for Football: Replacing Electrolytes Prevents Muscle Cramps

The loss of electrolytes such as sodium and potassium through sweat can lead to muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting and even death.  Electrolytes are minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chloride) which send messages to nerves and muscles throughout the body,  and are involved with muscle contraction and relaxation during exercise, so that an imbalance can impact the actual contraction of the muscle itself.
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