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post-concussion syndrome

Aerobic Exercise May Help Lessen Symptoms In Children and Teens With Post-Concussion Syndrome

Aerobic therapy (AT) may lessen the symptoms experienced by children and adolescents suffering from post-concussion syndrome and allow them to return to baseline, report researchers in a paper presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in October 2015 in Washington, D.C.

Post-Concussion Syndrome: New Therapies Offer Hope, Says Mother Of Hockey Star, Caitlin Cahow

In her long road to recovery from post-concussion syndrome, two-time Olympic hockey star Caitlin Cahow had the best help a daughter could ask for, a mom who was there for her, no questions asked.  Caitlin's mom, a physician herself, shares with MomsTEAM's Brooke de Lench her perspective on new treatment therapies.

Study First To Prove Benefit Of Cognitive and Physical Rest In Concussion Recovery

A week of strict cognitive and physical rest significantly improves performance of concussed athletes on neurocognitive tests and decreases severity of post-concussion symptoms, a first-of-its-kind study finds. The beneficial effects of the week of rest were seen whether the rest came soon after a concussion or even weeks to months later.

Chiropractic Neurology: A Possible Therapy for Post-Concussion Syndrome

One possible therapy for athletes with post-concussion syndrome is treatment by a chiropractic neurologist, who uses a deep toolbox of non-invasive sensory experiences to gently stimulate (or calm) targeted areas of the brain or nervous systems in order to reduce neurologic imbalance and improve function and productivity.

Post-Concussion Syndrome: Possible Therapies

While no medicine has been shown to effectively speed the recovery from concussive brain injury, some new and non-traditional therapies have been shown to help relieve the symptoms of post-concussion syndrome, as well as the value of strict cognitive and physical rest.

Treating Post-Concussion Syndrome: No Cookie Cutter Answers

In the small percentage of cases where a student-athlete's concussion symptoms, such as headache, do not resolve quickly (a condition called post-concussion syndrome), treatment by a team of specialists is recommended, as there are no cookie-cutter answers, says sports concussion neuropsychologist, Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D.

No Video Games After Concussion: A Defense

The other day I received an email from a neuropsychologist at a well-known New England medical center (I'll call him "Dr. A" for short) wondering whether there was any evidence to support the recommendation made in a number of articles in our concussion center, as well as videos, that, as part of the cognitive rest a concussed student-athlete needs during concussion recovery, he or she should not play video games:

When a neuropsychologist at a leading New England medical center is skeptical about the basis for MomsTeam's recommendation against a concussed student-athlete playing video games while symptomatic after concussion, Brooke de Lench provides the backup and ends up winning praise for the site's concussion center.

Concussion Therapies: Amantadine Shows Potential in Treating Post-Concussion Syndrome

A first-of-its-kind study reports that the drug Amantadine shows promise in treating adolescents who have not spontaneously recovered from concussion following a 3 to 4 weeks of cognitive and physical rest.

Multiple Concussion History Linked to Continuing Symptoms

Student athletes with a multiple concussion history are significantly more likely to experience continuing concussion-related symptoms such as headache, balance problems, dizziness than their peers with a history of one or no concussions, finds a new study to be published in the journal Neurosurgery.

Post-Concussion Syndrome: When Symptoms Persist

While concussion symptoms usually clear within a week to ten days, in some cases, an athlete's physical, cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral symptoms persist, a condition known as post-concussion syndrome (PCS). 
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