News & Studies

Eating Disorders in Athletes: The Good News

There is good news about eating disorders. As a friend, parent, or coach, you can help prevent them in young athletes!

Summer Camp: Is It Where Disordered Eating Sometimes Starts?

For all the great things about summer camp, it may also be a place where children, away from parental supervision for weeks or even months, can develop disordered eating behaviors, say experts.  Here are some tips to help parents plan a healthy, fun camp experience for their children and proactively practice eating disorders prevention.

Disordered Eating and Body Image Issues Among Athletes Rising

Eating disorders affect an estimated 13 to 42% of athletes, depending on sport and gender. The number of reported cases appear to be on the rise as a result of increased public awareness and a greater willingness of athletes to seek treatment.

Eating Disorders Affect More Than Half Million Teens, New Study Says

A new government study reports that more than half a million teens have had an eating disorder, most commonly in the form of binge eating disorder and bulimia, and that a majority seek no specific treatment for their eating or weight problems.

Cheerleaders At Risk For Eating Disorders, Body Image Issues

College cheerleaders are at high risk for body image issues and eating disorders - and may be affected by how revealing their uniforms are, according to a study presented at the American College of Sports Medicine's 57th Annual Meeting in Baltimore.

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week is Feb. 21 to 27

Most people know that eating disorders can be life-threatening.  What most people don't know is that eating disorders cause more deaths annually than all other mental and emotional health conditions combined.  That's why the Chicago-based Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center and the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) have designated the week of February 21 to 27, 2010 as National Eating Disorder Awareness Week. 

Praise, Not Criticism Needed From Parents, Coaches and Trainers

Parents, coaches and trainers should criticize athletes less, praise them more, reduce pressure to win and on appearance  to reduce risk of eating disorders.

Eating Disorders in Athletics: Pressure from Parents, Coaches and Appearance Expectations Play Role

Parents, coaches and trainers should criticize athletes less, praise them more, reduce pressure to win and on appearance  to reduce risk of eating disorders.
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