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Concussions: Parents Are Critical Participants in Recognition, Treatment, Recovery

Parents are critical participants in the recognition and treatment of, and recovery from, a concussion, not only in the first 24 to 48 hours but during every step in the process towards an eventual return to the play.

Sports Concussion Myths and Misconceptions

Sports concussion myths are still common, despite increased media focus and education in recent years.

Sports-Related Concussions: Many Not Diagnosed, Says Study

Nearly a third of patients at two leading sports concussion clinics reported having previously suffered a concussion which went undiagnosed, says a new study, putting them at increased risk of longer recovery from concussion, the cumulative effects of concussive injury, and of second impact syndrome.

High Initial Concussion Symptom Score Suggests Longer Recovery, Study Says

What factors predict which athletes recover quickly from concussion and which will take longer has proved to be a vexing question. A new study suggests an elegantly simple and intuitive answer: the athletes who take longer to recover report the most severe symptoms right after injury; the more severe the initial symptoms, the more likely a longer recovery.

Concussion Expert Revises Return To Play Guidelines

Pioneering concussion expert, Dr. Robert Cantu, issues revised return to play guidelines focusing on loss of consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia, concussion number, and time signs and symptoms take to clear at rest and with progressive exertion as factors.

Concussions in High School Sports: Few Report Loss of Consciousness

A new study of concussions suffered by high school athletes shows that loss of consciousness is uncommon, suggesting a greater understanding in the athletic community that loss of consciousness is not required for a concussion diagnosis.

NFHS Tightens Concussion Rules

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) is implementing a new concussion rule for the 2010-11 academic year which not only requires immediate removal of any athlete suspected of having suffered a concussion but bans his return until cleared to play by an appropriate health-care professional. This rule also covers youth leagues that play under high school rules or modified high school rules, but does not apply in those states where even stricter concussion laws have been recently passed.

Vast Majority of Concussions Do Not Involve Loss of Consciousness

Study shows LOC of greater than one minute duration may be associated with delayed return to play.  As a result, prolonged LOC is considered a factor that may influence management of such concussions.

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