Home » Health & Safety Channel » Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Youth Sports Concussion Safety Laws: District of Columbia

On July 27, 2011, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray signed into law the Athletic Concussion Protection Act of 2011, adding the District of Columbia to the list of states that have passed strong youth sports concussion safety legislation since May 2009.

Ivy League Football Completes First Season Under New Concussion Prevention Rules

The Ivy League adopted groundbreaking new rules for the 2011 football season intended to lower the risk of concussion and the number subconcussive hits, including reducing to two the number of full-contact, in-season practices allowed per week. New research suggests that such repeated hits may cause more brain damage than blows resulting in diagnosed concussions.  

Athletes with Concussion History At Increased Risk of Future Injury

Athletes who have sustained a concussion are at increased risk for sustaining another compared to athletes without a concussion history. Although experts offer several possible explanations, the precise reasons are unknown.

Whether Mouth Guards Reduce Concussion Risk Unclear

Whether mouth guards prevent concussive brain injury remains unclear, says MomsTeam concussion expert, William P. Meehan, III, M.D.

Reducing Concussion Risk in Youth Soccer

While a 2010 study found no evidence that purposeful "heading" of a soccer ball leads to either short-term (acute) or cumulative brain damage, such as cognitive dysfunction, concussion experts nevertheless suggest that steps be taken to minimize the risk of concussive injury to youth soccer players, particularly younger players.

Glasgow Coma Scale Used In Evaluating Level of Consciousness, Not Concussion Severity

Emergency medicine provider use the 15-point Glasgow Coma Scale to determine level of consciousness based on responses to various stimuli.  Patients with suspected concussive injury are categorized  as having mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) if they score a 14-15 on on the GCS, but the scale is not useful in assessing the severity of concussion or how long recovery will take, so that the terms mTBI and concussion should not be used interchangeably, says William P. Meehan, III, MD, MomsTeam concussion medicine expert and author of Kids, Sports, and Concussions.

Youth Sports Concussion Safety Laws: Alabama

On June 9, 2011, Alabama governor Robert Bentley signed the state's youth sports concussion safety bill into law.  Alabama joined a growing group of states that passed such laws since May 2009, when Washington State's groundbreaking Zackery Lystedt Law was enacted.

Youth Sports Concussion Safety Laws: Missouri

On July 13, 2011, Missouri governor Jay Nixon signed into law H.B. 300, 334, and 387, titled the "Interscholastic Youth Sports Brain Injury Prevention Act."   Missouri is the twenty-fifth state to enact strong youth sports concussion safety legislation since the Washington State's groundbreaking Zackery Lystedt Law was enacted in May 2009.

Effects of Concussion: Subtle Yet Prolonged For Those With Multiple Concussion History

Multiple concussions in high school athletes impair sustained attention and cognitive flexibility for a long period of time after the injury.  Youth athletes who have sustained two or more previous concussions but who do not report or demonstrate any physical, medical, or cognitive difficulties related to a history of concussion report significantly lower academic GPAs, and more concussion-related symptoms.

Syndicate content