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Strength, Conditioning, and Resistance Training

Weightlifting For Youth: Can Be Safe and Enjoyable, Expert Panel Says

Participation in the sport of weightlifting and the performance of weightlifting movements as part of a strength and conditioning program can be safe, effective and enjoyable for children for children and adolescents, says a new position statement by an international panel of experts.

Expert Panel Issues Resistance Training Guidelines For Children and Adolescents

A new international consensus position statement contains comprehensive guidelines on youth resistance training, and has been endorsed by 10 leading professional organizations within the fields of sports medicine, exercise science, and pediatrics. 

Resistance Training For Children: Emphasize Muscle Strength, Function, And Control, Not Muscle Size

Appropriately designed resistance training programs can benefit youth of all ages, with children as young as 5-6 years of age making noticeable improvements in muscular fitness following exposure to basis resistance training using free weights, elastic resistance bands and machine weights, says a new international consensus statement.

Resistance Training For Children and Teens: Compelling Evidence of Benefits, Expert Group Says

Thinking about starting your child or teen in a resistance training program, but wondering whether it is a good idea? Not only is there no cause for concern, but, according to a new international consensus statement (Loyd RS, et al 2014), resistance training for children and adolescents has two major benefits: improved athletic performance and a positive effect on overall health.

School-Based Strength Training Helps Kids Become Stronger, Boys Become More Active

Substituting 45 minutes of supervised school-based strength training for 2 of 3 regular PE classes significantly increased upper and lower body strength in healthy schoolchildren aged 10 to 14 years, and significantly increased daily spontaneous physical activity outside the training for boys.

Muscle-Enhancing Behaviors More Common Among Teens Than Previously Thought

The use of muscle-enhancing behaviors among middle and high school boys and girls - including such unhealthy behaviors as using protein powders or shakes, steroids, and other muscle-enhancing substances - is substantially higher than previously reported, a new study finds.

Neck Strengthening Exercises To Reduce Concussion Risk

When athletes see a hit coming, they instinctively flex their neck muscles. Since it is the acceleration of the brain after a force is applied or transmitted to the head that results in concussion, reducing the acceleration of the head after impact can reduce the risk of sustaining a sport-related concussion. One way to do that is by strengthening the neck muscles.

Weight Training For Youth Athletes: More to Getting Stronger Than Pumping Iron

In today's hyper-competitive youth sports environment, young athletes are constantly seeking ways to gain an advantage; so much so, in fact, that kids have begun rushing into the weight room in record numbers.  But doing so before laying a sound physical foundation first is a mistake, and one that can often lead to serious long term consequences.

Strength and Conditioning Coach: Bigger Better, Nutrition Key, Mental Toughness Essential

Strength and conditioning coach Mike Boyle advises parents of young
athletes that: bigger is better, nutrition is key, and developing mental
toughness and commitment is essential.

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