Injury Prevention

Standardizing Preparticipation Physical Exams Is Goal Of New NATA Position Statement

A standardized process for conducting the preparticipation physical examination is needed to ensure a safe playing environment for athletes and to help identify those conditions that may predispose an athlete to injury or sudden death, says the National Athletic Trainers' Association in a new position statement.

Survey To Collect Data On Health Screening Of Athletes

We've been asked by Gloria Wu, M.D., a physician active in the Sudden Cardiac Death Association of San Jose, California, and an Associate Clinical Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, for help on a research project she is working on in the area of health screening (a/k/a pre-participation physical evaluations) and its importance to athletes. Please help Gloria and her team by taking this 1-minute survey to help them learn more about this issue.

CPR Training for Parents: Why It's Important and What You Should Know

Nearly 350,000 people suffer cardiac arrest annually.   Because cardiac arrest leads to the death of one youth athlete every three days in the United States, sports parents should know how to perform CPR and use an AED, which can significantly increase a victim's chances of survival.

Many U.S. High Schools Unprepared For Cardiac Emergency

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of sudden death in exercising young athletes, but despite data showing that early defibrillation with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can save nearly two-thirds of student-athletes who suffer SCA, many U.S. high schools are not prepared to respond to an SCA or have significant deficiencies that could be improved, a new study finds.

Vincent Burke (Physical Therapist): Recognized Signs Of Athlete's Life-Threatening Heart Condition

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam asked 30 experts to write a blog in 2012 answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear again from Vincent Burke, a physical therapist, and the owner and operator of Infinity Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine and the Infinity Fitness & Sports Institute in Rochelle Park, New Jersey.

By Vincent M. Burke, PT, DPT, MPT, BS, NASM-CPT

Sometimes a physical therapist does more than just help an athlete recover from injury.  Sometimes they can actually help save an athlete's life.

Commotio Cordis: Can A Chest Protector Help?

Commotio cordis is the medical term for a rare disruption of the heart's electrical system resulting from a blunt impact to the chest that leads to sudden cardiac arrest. While commercially available chest protectors have not been shown in any peer-reviewed studies to prevent commotio cordis, whether such a heart shield provides an extra measure of protection for athletes playing baseball, lacrosse, and hockey, the sports with the highest rates of sudden death from the condition, is unknown.

Preventing Commotio Cordis in Youth Baseball

Young baseball and softball players who receive direct ball impact to the chest wall directly over the heart may develop sudden cardiac arrest, a condition called commotio cordis.  Teaching batters to turn away from an inside pitch, and pitchers to react as quickly as possible to a batted ball hit back at them can help reduce the risk, and an AED and a someone trained in CPR should be on-site.

Commotio Cordis: Tragedy on an Arizona Diamond

In early June 2010 tragedy struck a baseball field in Arizona when a 13-year-old Little Leaguer trying to bunt was struck in the chest. He took a few steps towards first base, collapsed, and died the next morning. Getting hit by a pitch is to be expected when playing baseball. Dying is not. What killed the Arizona boy? A rare condition called commotio cordis.

Screening Athletes For Heart Conditions: Debate Continues

The death of young, seemingly healthy, athletes from undetected heart problems often generates considerable media attention and re-ignites the debate over the optimal approach to screening young competitive athletes for heart problems to minimize death from sudden cardiac arrest.

To Nineteen Athletes Dying Young

During the 2003 fall sports season, MomsTeam received numerous e-mails, phone calls and visits with news far exceeding our worst fears about the number of deaths in youth sports.
Syndicate content