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MomsTEAM Institute's Screening Of Sony Pictures' Concussion Movie Ends Year On High Note, But More Work To Be Done

On December 21, 2015, MomsTeam Institute of Youth Sports Safety held a special advance screening of Sony Pictures's new movie, Concussion, starring Will Smith, at the Loews - Boston Common theatre. The screening capped off an incredible fifteen months for the Institute.

Helmetless Tackling and Blocking Drills Lead to Decreased Head Impacts in College Football Players

Engaging in a 5-minute helmetless tackling drill twice a week during pre-season football and once a week during the season reduced by almost a third the frequency of impacts to the head over the course of a single season, reports a groundbreaking new study.

School Is Where Teens Get Exercise, But It's Not Enough, Study Says

Even though adolescents spend less than 5 percent of their time at school engaging in physical activity, according to a new study, such time accounts for almost half of their overall exercise, and was still 20 minutes than the amount experts recommend.

College Athletes Start Playing Their Sport Early, But Specialize Late, Research Shows

Early sports specialization has been increasingly viewed as increasing an athlete's chances of achieving elite status, but has raised significant concerns, both as to whether it actually accomplishes that objective, and whether it carries with it an increased risk for sports-related injuries. A quartet of research papers explore various aspects of the issue.

Cheerleading Injuries in High School Sports: Less Common, But More Severe

High school cheerleaders don't get injured as often as athletes in other sports, but, when they do, the injuries are more serious, finds a first-of-its-kind study published in the journal Pediatrics.

Prevention, Not Litigation, Should Be Primary Strategy For Youth Sports Concussion

A longtime law professor and youth hockey coach argues that national, state, and local programs designed to prevent concussions are preferable to litigation because they are proactive, not reactive. 40 years, and I coached youth ice hockey for 42 years. My experiences teach me that prevention efforts must remain the primary strategy to meet the youth sports concussion crisis, not litigation. The reason is that prevention is proactive; litigation is mostly reactive.

Aerobic Exercise May Help Lessen Symptoms In Children and Teens With Post-Concussion Syndrome

Aerobic therapy (AT) may lessen the symptoms experienced by children and adolescents suffering from post-concussion syndrome and allow them to return to baseline, report researchers in a paper presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in October 2015 in Washington, D.C.

Concussion Discussion: Encouraging Female Athletes to Be Safer, Stronger

A mental training coach encourages female athletes to be their own health advocates and to play safer and smarter, especially one it comes to concussions.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Concussion Education For Youth Football Parents

Elizabeth M. Pieroth, Psy.D, a Board Certified Neuropsychologist, and Associate Director of the Sports Concussion Program at the NorthShore Medical Group, talks about concussions in youth football in this comprehensive and informative half-hour presentation to parents in Grand Prairie, Texas.

High School Athletic Directors Face Numerous Obstacles In Hiring Athletic Trainers, Study Finds

Athletic directors at the thirty percent of U.S. high schools lacking access to athletic trainers identify lack of AD hiring authority, budgetary constraints and non-budget factors, including rural location, misconceptions about an AT's role, and community interference, as barriers to hiring athletic trainers, a new study published in the Journal of Athletic Training reveals.
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