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NATA Releases Executive Summary Of Revised Exertional Heat Illness Position Statement

NATA has released an executive summary of a new position statement on exertional heat illnesses revising its 2002 statement to reflect new research and expert consensus.

AFL Becomes First Professional Sports League to Require Helmet Impact Sensors

The Arena Football League (AFL), in partnership with Brain Sentry, has become the first professional sports league to require helmet-mounted impact sensors to alert sideline personnel to hits that may cause concussion.

Reebok-CCM Recalls Throat Collars Due To Laceration Hazard

Throat collars have been decertified by BNQ in Canada due to the risk that a skate blade could penetrate the collar, posing a laceration hazard to the throat.
Reebok-CCM Throat Collar recalled by CPSC

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled throat collars and contact their local hockey dealer to return the product for a full refund or replacement, or contact Reebok-CCM for information on how to return the product directly to Reebok-CCM for a replacement or full refund.

Back in Action, If Not In The Game: A Halftime Report On A Teenager's Recovery From A Stress Fracture Of His Spine

First, a thank you

In my last blog I wrote about my son's back injury and the start of physical therapy, but before I report on his progress, I want to extend a special thank you to everyone who contacted me after reading my blog post. My intuition told me that the fractured spine he suffered is an injury that has affected many other youth athletes and families. I was completely overwhelmed by the number of people who called, emailed, IM'd, commented on the blog site, or ran me down (figuratively, at least) in the grocery store to ask about my son. Thank you all so much.

After suffering a stress fracture of his lumbar spine, a 13-year-old Texas football player begins rehabbing his injury with rigorous physical therapy. His mom provides a halftime report from the sideline.

Football Concussion Return-To-Play Guidelines

A multidisciplinary sports medicine team at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific return-to-play guidelines after concussion for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk of mild traumatic brain injury, including football.

Atlanta Medical Group Proposes Sport-Specific Return-to-Play Guidelines

Four years after the American Academy of Pediatrics adopted the recommended return-to-play (RTP) guidelines proposed by the Third International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific guidelines for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk for concussion.

Sideline-Dropstick Test: A Simple Measure of Reaction Time To Help Identify Athletes With Possible Concussion?

A simple, easy-to-construct and easy-to-use dropstick device to measure reaction time, which is impaired after concussion, could help sideline personnel identify athletes to remove from play because of possible concussion, and in concussion assessment and management.

How to Improve Youth Sports Safety: Focus On Protecting The Whole Child

As a woman and mother fighting to keep kids safe playing sports for the past twenty-five years, MomsTEAM Founder, Brooke de Lench, knows that, just as it takes a village to raise a child, it takes the involvement of every youth sports stakeholder to protect children at play from abuse, not just physical abuse, but emotional, psychological and sexual, and from sports injuries, many of which are preventable.

Preventing Youth Sports Injuries Begins Before First Practice

For the past 14 years, MomsTEAM has been working to educate parents on ways to keep their kids safe playing sports. One of the best ways to improve youth sports safety is to take steps to prevent injuries before the first practice.  Here's a checklist developed by the National Athletic Trainers' Association of 15 questions parents should ask their child's school or sports programs before they take them to their first practice, with links to related MomsTEAM content.

Modern Infilled Synthetic Turf Fields Don't Harbor Staph Bacteria or Cause MRSA, Studies Say

Skin infections associated with contact with synthetic turf have received national attention in recent years, but there is no scientific evidence to support concern that the surfaces of infilled synthetic turf (the kind containing crumb rubber found in all fields built since the late 1990's) harbor the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium, the bacteria that cause MRSA, says a recent study.
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