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Overuse Injuries and Burnout in Youth Sports: What We Know And What We Don't

While much is known about the causes and risk factors associated with overuse injuries and burnout, more research is needed, concludes a new position statement on overuse injuries and burnout.

Is It Time To Put The "Ice" in RICE On Ice?

A new book challenges the decades-old use of ice in the treatment of sports injuries, with some now claiming it has no therapeutic value in sports medicine. On the other side are those who still swear by icing a sports injury to reduce acute-injury bleeding, relieve post-injury soreness, and for relieving pain. So, is it time to remove the "I" from the first-aid acronym RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation)? We checked with MomsTEAM's expert physical therapist to find out.

Research Papers and Peer-Reviewed Studies: A World of Difference

 

Last week, we posted to the site a group of four articles about a peer-reviewed study in the Journal of Neurosurgery showing that football helmet design affected concussion risk among a large group (or what scientists call a "cohort") of college football players.

Last week, we reported on a peer-reviewed study showing that football helmet design affected concussion risk. At the same time, we received a press release about an abstract of a research paper on football helmets reporting that they do very little to protect kids against the rotational forces that cause concussion.  MomsTEAM decided not to report on the paper, and here's why.

 

Concussion Education: Athletes and Parents Still Not Getting Nearly Enough

There is good news and bad news in a first-of-its-kind study about implementation of the nation's first youth sports concussion safety legislation. The good news is that nearly all football and soccer coaches at public high schools in Washington State have completed the required concussion education, are generally knowledgeable about concussions, and are comfortable in deciding when to refer players for additional evaluation for a suspected concussion. The bad news is that concussion education of athletes and parents was much less extensive.

More Evidence That King-Devick Test May Help Identify Concussed Athletes On Sports Sideline

A simple vision test performed on the sports sidelines was able to identify nearly 8 out of 10 athletes later found to have suffered a concussion, and when test results were combined with tests for cognition and balance, allowed identification of concussed athletes with 100% accuracy, according to researchers at New York University.

10 Tips for Teens to Prevent Cyberbullying

Technology and social media play an ever present part in teen's lives, making them vulnerable to cyberbullying. However, there are a few things that teens can do to reduce their chances of getting bullied. Here are 10 tips.

Involved Parents Raise Slimmer Adults

Remember that slim kid in school - the one with the cook-from-scratch mom? He's likely one of the fittest dudes at your high school reunion according to new research from Cornell University, published online in the journal PLOS ONE.

Schutt Helmets' CEO Blasts New Virginia Tech Helmet Study

A 2014 study (Rowson S, Duma S, et al 2014) reporting that football helmet design can reduce concussion risk has prompted criticism from some of the football helmet manufacturers whose helmets were not involved in the study. In the interest of accurate and complete reporting on the study, set out below is the full text of an email dated February 10, 2014 from Rob Erb, Chief Executive Officer of Schutt Helmets.

NFHS Adds “Targeting” and "Defenseless Player" To High School Football Rules for 2014

In an effort to reduce contact above the shoulders and lessen the risk of head and neck injuries in football, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) has revised the rules governing high school football for the 2014 season to add definitions of "targeting" and "defenseless player." 

Study Showing Football Helmet Design Reduces Concussion Rate Raises Many Questions, Says NOCSAE's Oliver

A 2014 study (Rowson S, Duma SM, et al 2014) reporting that football helmet design can reduce concussion risk raises more questions than it answers, says Mike Oliver, Executive Director of the National Operating Committee Standards and Equipment (NOCSAE), the non-profit group that sets standards for football helmets.
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