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Energy Drinks: What Teenagers, Doctors, and Parents Should Know

Reviewing current information about the content, benefits, and risks of the use of energy drinks by teens, a group of military doctors expressed "great concern" over the safety and negative effects of energy drinks, given their high caffeine content and the common practice on college campuses (and most likely at the high school level as well) of mixing energy drinks with alcohol.

High Salt Diet Linked To Greater Soft Drink Consumption and Increased Childhood Obesity Risk

One way to fight childhood obesity may be to reduce dietary intake of salt by children, says a new study. Reducing the amount of salt may help reduce the amount of sugary beverages consumed, which in turn, may lower childhood obesity risk.

Sports Drinks for Sports, Energy Drinks Never, Says Pediatrics Group

Sports drinks should be consumed by children and adolescents only when there is a need for fluid, carbohydrate and electrolyte replenishment during and after prolonged, vigorous sports participation, while the ingestion of energy drinks should avoided completely, recommends the American Academy of Pediatrics in a report published in the journal Pediatrics.

Energy Drinks Pose Serious Health Risks to Children,Teens and Young Adults Says New Study

Energy drinks may pose a risk for serious adverse health effects in some children, especially those with diabetes, seizures, cardiac abnormalities or mood and behavior disorders, says a new study in the March 2011 issue of Pediatrics. Reviewing data gleaned from a meta-search of the medical literature via PubMed (an online data base of medical journals) and print and trade media via Google, researchers at the University of Miami conclude that energy drinks have no therapeutic benefit to children, and both the known and unknown properties of the ingredients, combined with reports of toxicity, may put some children at risk for adverse health events.

Energy Drinks Banned at Virginia High School Football Games, Practices

Virginia has become the first state in the nation to ban the use of energy drinks such as Red Bull, Monster and Rockstar by student-athletes during high school football games and practices.

No Bull: Sports Drinks Fuel Young Athletes Playing Team Sports

Sometimes you just can't believe what you read online or in the newspaper.

You may have seen the headlines or heard the buzz:  "Energy Drinks May Give Young Sports Teams An Edge, Study Says" trumpeted one; "Energy drinks boost stamina, enhance performance of young team players," said another.

Time to rush out to the nearest supermarket to stock up on energy drinks for your young athlete. Right?

A Scottish study shows that sports drinks, consumed right before and at 15-minute
intervals during prolonged stop-and-go team sports such as soccer,
football, ice hockey, basketball, volleyball, and lacrosse, actually help young athletes play better, longer.

Energy Drinks: Frequently Asked Questions

Despite the popularity of energy drinks, especially among teens, both the National Federation of State High School Associations and American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend against their consumption by children and adolescents because of their potential adverse health effects.
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