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concussion signs and symptoms

Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.

 

SmartTeams™ Talks: MSU's Covassin Discusses Gender Differences In Concussion Risk and Outcomes

In a fact-filled and informative SmartTeams Talk™, a leading expert on gender and concussions reviews the research finding differences in concussion risk and outcomes between female and male athletes, and how MomsTEAM's SmartTeams™ program is designed to increase concussion reporting through education.

SmartTeams Talk: Uncle Says Nephew's Death Playing High School Football Was Game-Changer

In an emotional video, the first in a series of SmartTeam talks filmed at MomsTEAM Institute's September 2014 sports safety summit, a California man recalls the 2001 death of his 17-year-old nephew from Second Impact Syndrome during a high school football game and how his search for answers became a game-changer.

Atlanta Medical Group Proposes Sport-Specific Return-to-Play Guidelines

Four years after the American Academy of Pediatrics adopted the recommended return-to-play (RTP) guidelines proposed by the Third International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific guidelines for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk for concussion.

Multiple Concussions: No Lingering Effect On Cognitive Function, Says Study

Adolescent athletes with a history of multiple concussions perform just as well on brief computerized tests of neurocognitive function than those without such history, although those who a history of two or more concussions self-reported more concussion symptoms, says a new study.

King-Devick Test: An Important Part of Sideline Concussion Screening Battery

A new study says that including the King-Devick test, a measure of fast eye movement, along with neurocognitive and balance testing as part of a battery of rapid concussion screening tools could improve assessment of athletes for suspected concussion on the sports sideline.

Athletes' Resistance To Self-Reporting of Concussion Continues Despite Increased Education

Athletes continue to underreport concussion even when they know the signs and symptoms, finds a new study, suggesting that efforts to break the code of silence which pervades contact sports, and change the attitudes of athletes towards reporting concussion, don't appear to be working.
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