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Effects of Concussion on Higher Cognitive Function Persist In Teens, Study Says

Concussed adolescents have difficulty recovering the ability for high level thinking after injury and may require extended recuperation before full recovery of so-called 'executive function' is achieved, a new study finds, which adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that teenage athletes are particularly vulnerable to the lingering effects of concussion.

Muscle-Enhancing Behaviors More Common Among Teens Than Previously Thought

The use of muscle-enhancing behaviors among middle and high school boys and girls - including such unhealthy behaviors as using protein powders or shakes, steroids, and other muscle-enhancing substances - is substantially higher than previously reported, a new study finds.

Multiple Concussion History Linked to Continuing Symptoms

Student athletes with a multiple concussion history are significantly more likely to experience continuing concussion-related symptoms such as headache, balance problems, dizziness than their peers with a history of one or no concussions, finds a new study to be published in the journal Neurosurgery.

Energy Drinks Pose Serious Health Risks to Children,Teens and Young Adults Says New Study

Energy drinks may pose a risk for serious adverse health effects in some children, especially those with diabetes, seizures, cardiac abnormalities or mood and behavior disorders, says a new study in the March 2011 issue of Pediatrics. Reviewing data gleaned from a meta-search of the medical literature via PubMed (an online data base of medical journals) and print and trade media via Google, researchers at the University of Miami conclude that energy drinks have no therapeutic benefit to children, and both the known and unknown properties of the ingredients, combined with reports of toxicity, may put some children at risk for adverse health events.

Physical Activity Guidelines for Active Children and Adolescents

Regular physical activity in children and adolescents promotes health and fitness. Compared to those who are inactive, physically active youth have higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness and stronger muscles. They also typically have lower body fatness. Their bones are stronger, and they may have reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression.

AAP Recommendations On Sport-Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents

Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on the evaluation and treatment of sport-related concussions in children and adolescents based on the latest consensus of experts.

Protein-Rich Breakfasts May Help Obese Teens Manage Weight

New research in adolescents demonstrates that a protein-rich breakfast, containing eggs, improves appetite control and additional research shows that a higher protein diet may help obese adolescents manage weight.
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