Home » academic accommodations

academic accommodations

Study Confirms Adverse Effect of Concussion On Academic Learning And Performance of Children and Teens

Student-athletes who experience lingering concussion symptoms and their parents are more concerned about the adverse effect of concussion on learning and school performance, report more school-related problems, and more classes posing difficulty than students who recover more quickly, finds a new study.

Full Cognitive Activity After Concussion Delays Recovery, Study Finds

Teens who continue to engage in full cognitive activity after sport-related concussion take from 2 to 5 times longer to recover than those who limit such activity, a new study has found. The findings provide important support for current concussion guidelines recommending cognitive rest during the initial stages of recovery from concussion.

Ensure Successful Return To Classroom After Concussion, Says Pediatrics Group

Helping a student-athlete make a successful return to learning after a concussion is just as important as ensuring their safe return to sports, and requires a team approach involving parents, health care professionals, and schools, says the American Academy of Pediatrics in an important new clinical report.

Traumatic Brain Injury in Kids and Teens Can Impact School Performance

Kids and teens suffering from traumatic brain injury, such as concussion, may struggle with speech, language, and thinking, which can lead to problems reading or memorizing. A school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) can help a concussed student and his or her family and teachers to create a treatment plan.

Stuart Glassman (Physiatrist): Helped Concussed Student-Athlete Obtain Academic Accommodations

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from Dr. Stuart Glassman, a board certified specialist in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatry) in Concord, New Hampshire.

By Stuart Glassman, MD

A physiatrist talks about how, working with school guidance counselors, teachers and a high school principal, he was able to help a student-athlete who had seen her grades suffer after suffering a concussion obtain needed academic accommodations.

Return to Class After Concussion: Different For Every Student

When it is okay to return to a full academic school day after concussion is different for every student, says sports neuropsychologist Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D. Some may be able to return after only a day or two, while others may need to be progressed more slowly, and, in those cases, it is important to work with a health care professional who understands concussion and academic accommodations who can design a program tailored to the individual student's needs.

Academic Accommodations for Concussion Different For Each Student

A student-athlete's cognitive function after concussion ordinarily goes through two, and sometimes three, phases depending on the severity of concussion, and when a concussed athlete returns to school, academic accommodations are often required.

After Concussion: Returning To Class With Academic Accommodations Sometimes Needed

Taking a few days off from school to allow for complete physical and cognitive rest is usually enough to allow most athletes to return to class with no problems, but those who are still experiencing cognitive difficulties, academic accommodations may be necessary, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

After Concussion: Physical and Cognitive Rest Essential, Academic Accommodations Sometimes Required

In most cases, athletes who get five days of complete physical and cognitive rest and stay home from school after a concussion can return to the classroom the following week, but some may need academic accommodations, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

Recovering from Concussion: Teachers Play Important Role

Students with a concussion may have difficulty retaining new information and retrieving information when needed. To help a student remember better, here's a list of "Top 10" cognitive strategies for parents to give to teachers.

Syndicate content